Skip to main content

Caring for a child with depression/anxiety

Caring For A Child With Depression/Anxiety

Caring for a child with depression or anxiety can not only be challenging but difficult to experience as a concerned parent. Here are some things that you can do to be a part of your child’s recovery:

  • Learn about the disorder

    Learn as much as you can about depression or anxiety, whichever your child is struggling with:

    Call us at the Mann Talks Helpline and talk to a mental health professional about it.

    Look up information online from credible sources such as WHO, APA, White Swan Foundation for Mental Health, Minds.

  • Be mindful of your actions and words

    Depression and anxiety can cause a lot of unhelpful negative thoughts and while you may say something with the best of intentions, it can unintentionally have an adverse effect on your child’s mental health.

  • Avoid statements like these

    Criticizing their behavior

    “You’re always feeling tired”

    Comparing them to other people

    “Look at your friend, they also have the same exam but are they so scared?”

    Making light of their emotions

    “Everybody has ups and downs”

    Making statements about their resilience or ability

    “But you are so strong”
    “Depression is for the weak-minded”

    Criticizing their efforts

    “Oh look who’s up early today!”

  • Creating a safe space

    Be patient and lend an ear to your child to let them freely share their thoughts and emotions.

    Do not

    Instead

    Judge them for how they are feeling

    Let them express themselves freely

    Start giving them advice

    Just listen

    If you are unable to do this, encourage them to talk to somebody else - a peer, a sibling, a trusted adult or call us at the Mann Talks Helpline.

  • Take care of yourself

    It can be difficult to see your child go through a mental health issue. You may also experience some distress due to worry and guilt. Be sure to take breaks as a caregiver and reach out to your peers for support.

    If it gets overwhelming, reach out to us at the Mann Talks Helpline and talk to a mental health professional today.